Latest Posts

17 million-to-1? Two Wisconsin golfers sink hole-in-one on same hole on same day

- Advertisement -

Jan Stawicki wasn’t even supposed to play golf on Tuesday.

- Advertisement -

But his boss at Classic Lanes in Greenfield, Wisconsin texted him Monday to see if he would like to play Stars and Stripes Scramble at a golf club in Lomire. Since the bowling alley was closed this week, Stawicki, 40, was at home.

- Advertisement -

Sami Williams, 27, is participating in an event that benefits local veterans for the third year in a row. The physical therapist was one of the first to start game number 13.

- Advertisement -

By the end of the round, two golf-loving strangers would be bound by bizarre blows of fate with their first holes in the same location on the same day, in the same event, on the same hole.

SPORTS BULLETIN: Subscribe now for daily updates sent to your inbox

Williams’ ace hit number 13, using an iron 9 off the tee forward for 114 yards.

Sami Williams (left) and Jan Stawicki share the Sprecher Root Beer Stars and Stripes Scramble Hole Award thanks to their aces at Camelot Golf Club.
Sami Williams (left) and Jan Stawicki share the Sprecher Root Beer Stars and Stripes Scramble Hole Award thanks to their aces at Camelot Golf Club.

“I got up to hit and then he took off and I was like, ‘Oh, that’s a really good line if it’s long enough,'” Williams said. “Then we thought, ‘Oh, he bounced right in front of the hole. Then he started bouncing, bouncing, inside. And you could see it all the way because we were on a raised tee box.

“Because it was the first hole, basically no one has started playing yet. It was a shotgun launch. So everyone heard me scream and said, “Oh, that seems a little more exciting than a bird.” “

Stavitsky’s group was just moving and wondering what caused the fuss. A few hours later they came to the 13th hole. Stawicki played golf with three women, so he was the only one to hit a 176-yard first with a 7-iron.

“I hit him and there’s a hill to the left of the start of the green,” Stawicki said. “He leans towards the hole and I hit him and I sort of walked away from him. I saw the ball roll, and then I lost it and kind of said, “OK.” Everyone else was like, “Where did it go?”

“I said, ‘I don’t want to say this, but it could be in the hole.’ They’re like, “Yes, that’s right. Whatever.’ So we drive to the next tier so they can start the game and my cart partner says “I don’t see your ball on the lawn.” Are you sure?’ I said, “I’m sure he’s on green.” “

When they arrived for a closer inspection, a beam of light illuminated the hole. The only thing missing was a choir of heraldic angels.

“The sun was actually shining on the ball,” Stawicki said. “So he fired up the golf ball and you could see it. And I just started going crazy.”

Jan Stawicki (left) and Sami Williams made their first holes in one at a charity event at the Camelot Golf Club in Lomir.
Jan Stawicki (left) and Sami Williams made their first holes in one at a charity event at the Camelot Golf Club in Lomir.

He soon discovered an even crazier coincidence.

“They had an A on that hole and they said, ‘Someone else was in that hole a couple of hours ago,'” Stawicki said. “I’m like, ‘Was it the same hole?’ They’re like, “Yeah,” and I’m like, “That’s crazy!” “

Shortly after Stawicki’s throw, Williams finished her round in 12th place.

“The cart girl came up and said, ‘Oh, I hate to tell you, but I just gave injections to another guy who got in the same hole in the same hole as you,'” Williams said. ‘Really?’ “

The staff at a golf club in Camelot calculated that they average three holes a year. It’s not immediately clear if what Stawicki and Williams achieved happened before in the state. But it happened in Illinois in 2017 with history at PGA.com noting that “according to the National Hole-in-One Registry, the odds of two amateur players hitting aces on the same hole on the same course on the same day is approximately 17 million to 1.”

For this rare feat, Stawicki and Williams shared two cases of Sprecher Root Beer, which was awarded to the “nearest pin” golfer at the Stars and Stripe Scramble.

Stawicki said he plays about a dozen outings a year, with another one every few weeks.

“I’m more of an avid bowler,” Stawicki said. — And I had several 300 games. My first hole in one, I mean maybe sort of set yourself up for a higher level and now you want another one.”

Williams played golf at Sussex-Hamilton High School and Lakeland College. She still attends classes about once a month. This ace has ignited the competitive fire.

“I’m going to keep playing,” she said. “My dad has three, so I still need to get it.”

This article originally appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Two golfers in Wisconsin on the same day fell one hole in one



Source: sports.yahoo.com

- Advertisement -

Latest Posts

Don't Miss