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Commanders reach settlement with Maryland AG over allegations of withholding ticket deposits

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The Maryland Attorney General’s Office has reached a settlement with the Washington Commanders after the team was accused of failing to return a deposit to ticket holders, it was announced Friday.

The settlement requires the commanders to return all remaining security deposits and pay a $250,000 fine.

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Attorney General Brian Frosch alleges that the team should have returned the security deposit collected from season and luxury ticket holders, but did not do so within the required 30 days. Instead, the team allegedly only returned deposits to ticket holders who made a written request, in violation of the Consumer Protection Act.

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“For years, commanders kept money that did not belong to them. They belong to their clients,” Attorney General Frosch said. “Today’s settlement will require the team to return money owed to consumers. Commanders will pay a fine and be prohibited from engaging in such practices in the future.”

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The settlement does not relieve commanders from separate legal proceedings arising from the allegations.

D.C. Attorney General Carl A. Racine announced Thursday that his department is also suing the commanders under the Expected Deposit Scheme, in addition to a separate lawsuit that was announced the week before, on 10 November.

We understand the costumes of commanders

In 2020, over 40 women, including former employees and support groups, accused owner Dan Snyder and Commands executives of sexual harassment. Snyder himself initially hired an outside lawyer to investigate, but Goodell and the NFL soon took over. The investigation found that commanders over the years created a hostile work environment that particularly affected women and typically included bullying, intimidation and sexual harassment up to the highest ranks of the organization. However, the written report was never published.

The lawsuit over the alleged deposit scheme began when commanders were investigated by Congress for workplace misconduct. Jason Friedman, Commanders’ former longtime vice president of sales and customer service, testified before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform about the scheme in March and handed over numerous spreadsheets and other documents. Just a month later, the committee wrote a letter to the Federal Trade Commission accusing them of hiding NFL revenue for more than a decade by withholding margin deposits. The attorneys general of Maryland, D.C., and Virginia launched parallel investigations.

This investigation into workplace misconduct by commanders sparked a November 10 lawsuit from the District of Columbia attorney general alleging that the commanders, Snyder, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, and the NFL “conspired to deceive fans” by allegedly hiding all workplaces and sexual relations. allegations of team misconduct.

Landover, MD - February 2: Co-owner Dan Snyder makes remarks as the Washington football team announces the name of their new team
Dan Snyder is co-owner of Washington Commanders. (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)



Source: sports.yahoo.com

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