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Jake Paul fight: Breaking down the undefeated social media star’s strengths and weaknesses in the ring

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Ever since social media superstar Jake Paul moved into the square, there has been one question at the center of every criticism or support for his career: Is Jake Paul really a good boxer? Rarely do those on both sides of the debate really delve into Paul’s technique in the ring.

It’s much easier to look at Paul’s level of opposition, as well as the questionable – and often abusive – behavior of him and his brother Logan in the past. Then just write him off as a non-serious boxer and someone with no noticeable skill between the ropes.

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On Saturday night, Paul will fight for the sixth time as a pro when he takes on 47-year-old UFC legend Anderson Silva. Showtime’s main boxing event pay-per-view. Silva, one of the greatest strikers in the history of mixed martial arts, is the first fighter Paul has faced who has had any professional boxing experience. Silva is 3-1 as a boxer and defeated former world middleweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.

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Without a doubt, the fight with Silva is the biggest test of Paul’s career. Silva has the strength, agility and timing that has often allowed him to make Chávez look stupid in their June 2021 clash. If Paul is indeed a “bad boxer” as many critics suggest, Silva will work on him thoroughly.

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With that in mind, Morning Kombat’s Luke Thomas broke down Paul’s technique to determine the positives and negatives of his game.

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Thomas identified six key points in compiling a scouting report on Paul.

  • Paul’s best offense comes when he moves forward, working behind the jab, creating combinations or opening other punches.
  • Paul can read his opponent’s defensive tendencies during combat and modify his offense to take advantage of those readings.
  • Much of Paul’s approach revolves around feints and body work. Woodley’s knockout in their rematch was a direct result of previous body work, which allowed Paul to lean in as if he were walking towards the body with a right hand before hitting a right to the chin as Woodley let his guard down.
  • Paul often lowers his arms, both when moving and when striking, leaving open spaces for stronger opponents to take advantage of.
  • In the first fight with Woodley, Paul showed severe deficiencies in footwork and balance, often crossing his legs or being at a distance where he would be forced to expand his base, which reduced the potential power of his punches.
  • When throwing power punches, Paul often looked down rather than at the target of his punches. This was more of a problem in the first fight with Woodley than in the rematch, with Paul’s eyes glued to Woodley’s chin as he landed the finishing blow with his right hand.

Silva’s camp no doubt noticed many of these things and prepared their fighter to try and use their skills to exploit any available gaps in Paul’s game. Silva has the reflexes and technique to take advantage of sloppy moments on defense or footwork, and Paul will need to keep showing improvement if he wants to stay undefeated.



Source: www.cbssports.com

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