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Jon Cooper on Game 3 Video Review: ‘Maybe it Shouldn’t Be in Our Hands’

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TAMPA – If you caught Game 3 in Tampa Bay, one of your highlights or maybe your weakest moments? – there was a lengthy video review process from the game that ultimately denied the Colorado Avalanche a goal 1-0.

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It started with Lightning coach John Cooper taking time to get a good look at the video replay, and ended with the situation center in Toronto taking his time to cancel the goal.

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It didn’t count in the end, but the Avalanche managed a 1–0 lead soon after. It didn’t last long and the Bolts went 6–2 down, cutting the series deficit in half.

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But after the game, Cooper was asked for a video review and was candid about his thoughts.

“Here’s the problem,” Cooper began. “And I have stated this before. We are at the mercy of the replays we get. So someone might disable something upstairs, we might not have replays, and something that is a black and white call might be missed. t.”

Video coaches have a matter of seconds to convey information to the head coach of the team about whether the goal should be reviewed. As soon as the game starts, this clock ends. Thus, for the most part, the teams depend on the video streams they receive, including any potential freezes, crashes, etc. when transferring footage to the teams, as well as the speed of replays from the broadcasters themselves.

“I don’t know if I’m in the minority on this issue. But I don’t know if it should be in our hands,” he continued. “If this is a game in the game or out of the game, I just don’t know why I should make such a decision. So when the stakes are so high, and we’re lucky that the timing and the look and all that stuff, we went for it.

“Why this happened is because you noticed how long it took the referees to call. That’s how close it was. I don’t know from what angles they looked. long.”

Cooper clarified that it took him and the team some time to access the footage, which clarified that the game was in fact out of the game.

“There was an angle at the very end,” he said. “It was an end zone angle… I don’t know where we got that from. So guys in the back, I don’t really understand how it all works. But from the end zone perspective, the guys inside were like, “I can’t tell if it’s white or grainy.” And I’m like: well, let’s be white. But it turned out to be offside.”

After all, an extra goal for the Avalanche wouldn’t have made much difference to the final score. But if it stalled and the Aves did score their next goal, they could have taken a 2-0 lead before the 10-minute mark – a familiar team from the last two games.

“Sometimes it can be difficult,” Cooper said. “It’s just that sometimes I wish we had to make that call. But it worked.”




Source: thehockeynews.com

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