Latest Posts

Rafael Nadal ‘mentally destroyed’ and has wife in tears after shock defeat

- Advertisement -
Spaniard Rafael Nadal looks dejected after losing in the second round match against Mackenzie McDonald of the USA
Spaniard Rafael Nadal looks dejected after losing in the second round match against Mackenzie McDonald of the USA

Rafael Nadal, t.he is the reigning champion and top seed Australian Opensaid he was “mentally devastated” after suffering another setback due to an injury exiting the tournament in the second round against Mackenzie McDonald.

Nadal fought bravely until the end of the match after seemingly bursting a muscle in his thigh despite lacking his usual fitness. But he seemed to be playing out of respect for the game and his opponent, rather than out of a belief that he could actually win.

- Advertisement -

Nadal subsequently explained that this latest setback, with his wife Maria crying in the stands as she watched him struggle with pain, hit especially hard after seven months of previous turmoil due to foot and stomach injuries.

- Advertisement -

“I have a history with a hip when I had problems,” Nadal later explained. “I had to do procedures in the past, apply a little. There weren’t that many problems. Now I feel like I can’t move.

- Advertisement -

“But I don’t know until I do the test and all that. It’s hard to decide if it’s a muscle, if it’s a joint, if it’s cartilage.”

Nadal was already having a hard time when he came to an awkward stop from a cross-court backhand.

At the time, he was a set and a break behind World No. 65 McDonald, a neat US stylist who made the ball sing with his flat, elegant ground shots.

The next moment after the initial injury, Nadal darted to the left to parry one of McDonald’s laser shots, but then had to abruptly stop chasing the ball due to obvious pain.

He squatted down for a moment, obviously in agony, and after a couple more points called a medical time-out.

As he sat in his chair with his head down, waiting for the coach to arrive, one could only think of the many injuries that had plagued him over the past year, including the so-called “zombie foot” that required the audacity to be desensitized and two separate rupture of the abdominal muscles.

Spain's Rafael Nadal leans over injury during a match against Mackenzie McDonald of the United States during the 2023 Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne - James Ross/Shutterstock
Spain’s Rafael Nadal leans over injury during a match against Mackenzie McDonald of the United States during the 2023 Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne – James Ross/Shutterstock

To his credit, Nadal managed to make the third set competitive, making quick kills in nearly every point. We got a glimpse of another player during this period – what Nadal would look like if he was looking to shorten plays rather than extend them.

But he could only run slowly from side to side, and McDonald eventually claimed victory with a score of 6-4, 6-4, 7-5.

Despite a poor start to the match, Nadal felt he was beginning to cope with McDonald’s slippery play even before the injury hit. As he ruefully added, “It doesn’t matter now.”

Could this string of injuries take Nadal out of the game? “It was not the right moment to have something like this now,” he said. “Sometimes it’s frustrating. Sometimes it’s hard to accept. Sometimes you feel very tired from all this in terms of injuries.

“Yeah, I can’t say that life is fantastic and stay positive and keep fighting. Not now. This is a tough day and you need to accept it and keep moving forward.

“I really hope that this doesn’t take me off the court for a long time, because then it’s hard to recover again. This is the entire amount of work that you need to collect in order to return to a decent level. I’ve gone through this process way too many times in my career and I think I’m ready to keep doing it, but it’s no doubt not easy.”

From the point of view of the organizers, Nadal’s early departure is just the latest blow to a tournament that has already lost many stars. including “five Netflix”Cast: Carlos Alcaras, Paula Badosa, Ayla Tomljanovic, Nick Kyrgios and Matteo Berrettini.

For Nadal, it also enhances his terrifying form. from September US Open up to seven defeats in nine matches. But his tennis will not be his immediate priority. He will need to assess the damage and develop a rehab schedule that could take him seriously leaning on the clay court he has dominated for so many years.

Nadal’s departure will also be welcome news for other seeds in his area of ​​play, including Francis Tiafoe and last year’s runner-up Daniil Medvedev.

Spain's Rafael Nadal draws attention during a medical break in his second-round singles match against Mackenzie McDonald of the United States on day three of the 2023 Australian Open - Will Murray - Will Murray/Getty Images
Spain’s Rafael Nadal draws attention during a medical break in his second-round singles match against Mackenzie McDonald of the United States on day three of the 2023 Australian Open – Will Murray – Will Murray/Getty Images

Could this string of injuries take Nadal out of the game? “It was not the right moment to have something like this now,” he said. “Sometimes it’s frustrating. Sometimes it’s hard to accept. Sometimes you feel very tired from all this in terms of injuries.

“Yeah, I can’t tell by lying that life is great and stay positive and keep fighting. Not now. This is a tough day and you need to accept it and keep moving forward.

“I really hope that [the injury] does not take me out of the court for a long time, because then it’s hard to restore everything again. This is the entire amount of work that you need to collect in order to return to a decent level. I’ve gone through this process way too many times in my career and I think I’m ready to keep doing it, but it’s no doubt not easy.”

From the point of view of the organizers, Nadal’s early departure is just the latest blow to a tournament that has already lost many stars. including “five Netflix”Cast: Carlos Alcaras, Paula Badosa, Ayla Tomljanovic, Nick Kyrgios and Matteo Berrettini.

For Nadal, it also enhances his terrifying form. from September US Open up to seven defeats in nine matches. But his tennis will not be his immediate priority. He will need to assess the damage and develop a rehab schedule that could take him seriously leaning on the clay court he has dominated for so many years. Nadal’s departure will also be welcome news for other seeds in his area of ​​play, including Francis Tiafoe and last year’s runner-up Daniil Medvedev.

Meanwhile, the Australian Open is behind schedule. Heatwaves forced players out of the outer courts on Tuesday, with incessant rain continuing the shutdowns.

Henman: It’s a terrible injury

Tim Henman described the scenes as “a sad sight” and said that Nadal’s discomfort looked like a “nightmare injury”.

“Mackenzie McDonald deserves a lot of credit because he was on that baseline and dictated what was sort of the result,” Henman told Eurosport. “It was awful to see – we saw Nadal deal with so many injuries in his career, but on this stage after his performance 12 months ago, he suddenly stopped … When he stopped so abruptly, we thought it was written. Wall, but McDonald still needed to focus and earned his win in the end.

“This is one of those nightmarish injuries. The game is physical for everyone and movement is important, but when you feel a sharp pain, it’s bad news because you think you’ve pulled something. We looked and thought it didn’t look good. It’s a sad sight.”

Rafael Nadal almost crying in his chair - DIEGO FEDELE/Shuttershock
Rafael Nadal almost crying in his chair – DIEGO FEDELE/Shuttershock

Henman was joined by pundit seven-time Grand Slam champion Mats Wilander, who believed the type of injury Nadal suffered was due to a combination of his age and lack of match practice.

“When you get hurt you’re out of luck, but you have to look at what happened and Rafa was pushed too far into the corner by Mackenzie on the right inside out,” Wilander said.

“Rafa has to run and he ends up getting injured, so in my opinion it’s a TKO, probably because we’re watching a man who is 36 years old and hasn’t played enough matches, but it all comes down to a lot of bad matches. good luck obviously.

“No one has a hip flexor [injury] in the 80s because the game wasn’t fast enough. There were times when you ran 100 percent for something, but the steps between shots were never explosive enough to hurt yourself. Today’s game is so different and it could happen at any time. It’s much faster and you have to push off immediately and there’s a lot of luck involved.”



Source: sports.yahoo.com

- Advertisement -

Latest Posts

Don't Miss