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What happens with the four remaining cases against Deshaun Watson?

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Last October, the then Texans quarterback Deshawn Watson could settle all but four civil suits against him. He wanted to resolve them all or none of them.

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Watson reached a preliminary settlement this week with all but four people who sued him for sexual harassment during massage therapy sessions. So what happens to the other four?

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Lawyer Tony Bazby said that the claims filed by Ashley Solis, the first person who filed the lawsuit, will be considered. Once 20 of the 24 cases are dismissed, the identities of the other three remaining plaintiffs will become known.

There are two explanations for the failure to settle the four cases. The plaintiffs either want more than what Watson offered or, for now, they just want to stand trial so their voices are heard and let the jury decide if Watson violated their rights.

As recently explained by Brent Schrotenburg of USA today, Solis may have the strongest case against Watson. Houston police detective Kamesha Baker recently testified in this regard, and Watson admitted under oath that Solis had “watery eyes” at the end of the session.

“Ashley Solis actually received a text message after the massage indicating that there was some questionable activity in which we were like, ‘OK, why would you want that if everything was fine?’ Baker testified through Schrotenburg. “If everything went well at the massage, why did you send her, in fact, an apology for the massage?”

Solis initiated the process, and Buzby demanded $100,000 on her behalf before the trial. Given that this amount served as a starting position, Buzbee was no doubt willing to take less. But Watson’s camp (Rusty Hardin was not involved at the time) refused to hire Bazby and wanted him to make a new offer. As far as litigation goes, this breach of etiquette is even more serious than going straight from a double dog challenge to a triple dog challenge.

Lawyers are outraged when they are asked to bid against themselves. The process entails a rhythm, back and forth. Watson’s representatives were to offer $20,000 or so to flesh out Buzby’s net worth based on his next move.

And for those who insist that this is “extortion”, it is not. Attempts to settle pre-trial settlements occur constantly. Settling claims before they turn into civil lawsuits makes sense for everyone. In this case, both parties would benefit from a quiet, careful attempt to administer justice.

Now that Solis has been forced to show her name, face and voice on television and elsewhere, she may be ready to let the chips fall wherever they are in court. However, it’s entirely possible that there’s an amount of $100,000 to, say, $1 million that will make her end it now. She has every right to make this decision – and everything could have been cut if Watson’s representatives had not been so short-sighted when their statement first came to their attention.



Source: profootballtalk.nbcsports.com

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