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Will Mary Jo White’s investigation include the 2009 allegations against Daniel Snyder?

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On Wednesday, the House Oversight Committee will ask Commissioner Roger Goodell a host of questions about the investigation into Washington commanders and the league’s handling of that investigation. Tuesday report from Washington Post lays the groundwork for a particular direction of issues that Goodell will no doubt face.

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With details of the 2009 incident involving former employee and team owner Daniel Snyder coming out for the first time, will Mary Jo White be asked to investigate the matter further in her ongoing investigation into Snyder and the COs?

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White was appointed to conduct additional investigations after former Commanders employee Tiffany Johnston tipped off Congress about the alleged Snyder incident in February. On Tuesday evening, Megan Imbert pointed to past statement from attorney Lisa Banks regarding the breadth of White’s investigation.

“I hope and expect Mary Jo White to include in her investigation the facts underlying the 2009 settlement,” Banks said. “Such information would be directly relevant to my client’s allegations, and therefore directly within the scope of Ms. White’s investigation.”

It is unclear whether or to what extent the 2009 allegations were fully explored by Beth Wilkinson’s lawyer during her 10-month investigation. Her attempt to get to the facts sparked a lawsuit aimed at maintaining a confidentiality agreement signed in connection with a reported $1.6 million settlement. Since Wilkinson was not asked to provide the league with a written report, it is impossible to know if the 2009 incident formed part of the basis for Goodell’s conclusions.

There will be a moment on Wednesday when he will answer specific and direct questions about this incident. And perhaps to ask Wilkinson to extract from her file a report that she no doubt prepared and submit it to the league, with the understanding that it will be treated in the same way as many other reports that have been processed by the NFL. when it comes to alleged misconduct. players – fully and completely and transparently released to the public for review and verification with any consequences that may be relevant.




Source: profootballtalk.nbcsports.com

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